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English Department Lecture by Professor Miriam Forman-Brunell, University of Missouri-Kansas City | Location: P.C. Hoofthuis, Spuistraat 134, room 605.

Detail Summary
Date 12 September 2019
Time 17:00 - 00:00

Why is girls’ history practically invisible in the academy, public history, and digital humanities, especially after more than three decades of ground-breaking scholarship? What are scholars and students, teachers and curators, researchers and writers doing to increase the visibility, accessibility, and legitimacy of girls’ history? The Girls’ History and Culture Network, a collaboration of international scholars and students, teachers and curators, researchers and writers, seeks your insight and input into The Global Girls Public History Digital Resource, an innovative educational website that aims to provide such freely accessible teaching and learning materials as: The Girls’ History & Culture Syllabus Exchange and The Directory of Girls’ History and Culture Researchers; Girls’ History Bibliographies; the Girls’ History & Culture Lecture Bank, and The Girls’ History & Culture Booklet Series (featuring peer-reviewed essays on girls’ history scholarship, historiographic debates, and methodologies; girl-focused reviews of archival, museum and library collections; and close readings of girl-centered texts, print and visual sources and artifacts—from anime to zines).

About
Miriam Forman-Brunell, Professor Emerita of History at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, is the Co-Chair of the Girls’ History & Cultures Network, Co-Director of the NEH-funded Children & Youth in History website, board member of Girlhood Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal, The Journal of the History of Childhood and Youth, the International Girls Studies Association, and is the author and co-editor of many scholarly studies and reference works on the history of girlhoods in the US.

 All UvA students, staff and members of the public are welcome to attend